Transport maps in big cities baffle human brain, says study

“Mason Porter, professor of nonlinear and complex systems at the University of Oxford, said: “We know that there is empirical evidence for some cognitive limit – how many digits people can memorise from phone numbers, or how many moving objects.” Now, he added: “Cities and their transportation networks have grown to the point where they… Continue reading Transport maps in big cities baffle human brain, says study

Cracks in the digital map: what the ‘geoweb’ gets wrong about real streets

“There’s no such thing as a true map,” says Mark Graham, a senior research fellow at Oxford Internet Institute. “Every single map is a misrepresentation of the world, every single map is partial, every single map is selective. And every single map tells a particular story from a particular perspective.” – Cracks in the digital… Continue reading Cracks in the digital map: what the ‘geoweb’ gets wrong about real streets

Smartphones and the Uncertain Future of ‘Spatial Thinking’

“We no longer have to “read” maps as we once did. But it seems nearly certain that we spend more time looking at them. For every cognitive scientist watching connectivity diminish our talents of perception, cognition, and problem-solving, there are many more kids exploring the earth from their laptops.” – Smartphones and the Uncertain Future… Continue reading Smartphones and the Uncertain Future of ‘Spatial Thinking’