innovation

“In a recent article, Neil Brenner and Christian Schmid identified three “urban age discourses” that shape our current episteme. Urban triumphalism, as championed by economists like Edward Glaeser, regards the city as an engine of innovation and civilization and prosperity. Sustainable urbanism imagines cities as hotbeds of resilience and environmental consciousness. Finally, technoscientific urbanism reflects a neopositivist return to postwar systems thinking and centralized planning; it is especially visible in the discourse around “smart cities,” which regards the intelligence generated from spatial sensing and data analysis as a “fix” for perennial urban problems.” – Instrumental City: The View from New York’s Hudson Yards, circa 2019

“Prof. Christensen became a pivotal figure in management historyby using innovation to re-empower management. We can see him, in retrospect, as offering a comprehensive antidote to what American capitalists could only regard as the poison of neo-workplace democracy. Some 1980s business blockbusters were telling stockholders and executives to share power with a new, insufferably smart-ass “no-collar” generation of knowledge workers, and that only this concession would turn the tables on the Japanese.” – Christensen’s Disruptive Innovation after the Lepore Critique ~ Remaking the University